Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Menlo Castle


Menlo Castle is a 16th Century castle situated on the bank of the River Corrib in County Galway. It was built in 1569 and was home to the Blake family. 

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Fishing

"Lough Corrib is justly famous for its wild brown trout fishing, however a lot of salmon are also taken every year on the lake. Trolling and fly fishing account for most fish, and fish hold in certain areas prior to ascending spawning tributaries, or to rest after running the main river. The Narrows, the Glann shore and the Carrick shore are noted holding lies for salmon. Most local anglers troll when targeting salmon, although quite a few fish are taken on fly, including on trout flies by trout anglers.

Please note that you must have a salmon licence to fish for salmon, and that trout anglers who catch a salmon must by law release the fish if they do not hold a valid salmon licence in their possession." ~ www.fishinginireland


Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Lough Corrib



Captain of the Corrib Princess taking his boat out onto Lough Corrib.




The lough is home to all kinds of birds as well as otters, mink, stoat, frogs, and bats.


Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Corrib


The River Corrib (Irish: Abhainn na Gaillimhe) in the west of Ireland flows from Lough Corrib through Galway to Galway Bay. 



The river is among the shortest in Europe, with only a length of six kilometres from the lough to the Atlantic. 



Saturday, June 10, 2017

Flower Box


Flower Box
Galway, Ireland

Just loved how the red flowers stood out against those grey stones.

Friday, June 9, 2017

Vega



Street Musician
Galway, Ireland

According to the company's web site, Vega banjos are noted for their full, round depth of tone and dynamics, a sound that is ideal for old time music, fingerstyle, folk, and singer/songwriters.


Thursday, June 8, 2017

Garda Síochána


Garda Síochána
Galway, Ireland

"An Garda Síochána (Irish pronunciation: [ən ˈɡaːrd̪ə ˈʃiːxaːn̪ˠə] (listen); meaning "the Guardian of the Peace"), more commonly referred to as the Gardaí ([ˈɡaːɾˠd̪ˠiː] "Guardians") or "the Guards", is the police service of the Republic of Ireland. The service is headed by the Garda Commissioner who is appointed by the Irish Government. Its headquarters are in Dublin's Phoenix Park.

Since the formation of the Garda Síochána in 1923, it has been a predominantly unarmed force, and more than three-quarters of the force do not routinely carry firearms. As of 31 July 2018, the police service had 14,300 sworn members (including 549 Reserves) and 2,310 civilian staff. Operationally, the Garda Síochána is organised into six geographical regions: the Eastern, Northern, Southern, South-Eastern, Western and Dublin Metropolitan Regions.

In addition to its crime detection and prevention roles, road safety enforcement duties, and community policing remit, the police service has some diplomatic and witness protection responsibilities and border control functions." ~ Wikipedia

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Friday, June 2, 2017

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Prayer


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

"Now during those days he went out to the mountain to pray; and he spent the night in prayer to God. And when day came, he called his disciples and chose twelve of them, whom he also named apostles: Simon, whom he named Peter, and his brother Andrew, and James, and John, and Philip, and Bartholomew, and Matthew, and Thomas, and James son of Alphaeus, and Simon, who was called the Zealot, and Judas son of James, and Judas Iscariot, who became a traitor." ~ Luke 6:12-16

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Organ


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

"The current organ in St Nicholas’ Collegiate Church was built in 1912 by the celebrated British firm of Norman & Beard, incorporating a small amount of pipework (subsequently much revoiced) from an earlier JW Walker instrument of 1845. It remains largely in its 1912 state, although subsequent repairs and overhauls took place in 1945, 1957-9, 1963, 1977-8 and 1982, during which most of the original tubular pneumatic actions were discarded in favour of electro-pneumatic replacements. These actions have become increasingly unreliable and unresponsive, and the pipework and windchests have suffered over the years from water inundation. In certain weather conditions the resultant ciphers and runnings can rend the organ unplayable." ~ http://stnicholas.ie/history/music-history/the-organ/

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

St. Nicholas


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

"Saint Nicholas of Myra (traditionally 15 March 270 – 6 December 342), also known as Nicholas of Bari, was an early Christian bishop of the ancient Greek city of Myra in Asia Minor (modern-day Demre, Turkey) during the time of the Roman Empire. He is revered by many Christians as a saint. Because of the many miracles attributed to his intercession, he is also known as Nicholas the Wonderworker. Saint Nicholas is the patron saint of sailors, merchants, archers, repentant thieves, children, brewers, pawnbrokers, and students in various cities and countries around Europe. His reputation evolved among the faithful, as was common for early Christian saints, and his legendary habit of secret gift-giving gave rise to the traditional model of Santa Claus ("Saint Nick") through Sinterklaas." ~ Wikipedia

Monday, May 29, 2017

Peter, James & John


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

The panel that appears below yesterday's images of Moses and Elijah. Here we have from left to right, probably, James, Peter, and John. 

Sunday, May 28, 2017

The Transfiguration


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

Once on the mountain, Matthew 17:2 states that Jesus "was transfigured before them, and his face shone like the sun, and his clothes became dazzling white." At that point the prophets Elijah and Moses appear and Jesus begins to talk to them.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

Shamrock


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

A shamrock is a young sprig and a symbol of Ireland. Saint Patrick, Ireland's patron saint, is said to have used it as a metaphor for the Holy Trinity. The name comes from Irish seamróg, which is the diminutive of the Irish word for plant (seamair) and means simply 'little plant' or 'young plant.' 

Friday, May 26, 2017

Floral Arrangement


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

My hat's off to whoever arranges these flowers. If these flowers don't lift your spirits, nothing will. :-)

Votives





Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

Votive or prayer candles are small candles intended to be burnt as votive offerings as acts of Christian prayer. In Christianity, votive candles are commonplace in many churches, as well as home altars, and symbolize the prayers the worshipper is offering for him or herself, or for others. In other religions, such as Hinduism and Buddhism, similar offerings exist.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Font


























Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

The baptismal font is over 400 years old and the dog carved into its side still keeps an eye on Galway’s newest citizens as they are baptized.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Gargoyle



Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

"In architecture, a gargoyle is a carved or formed grotesque with a spout designed to convey water from a roof and away from the side of a building, thereby preventing rainwater from running down masonry walls and eroding the mortar between. Architects often used multiple gargoyles on a building to divide the flow of rainwater off the roof to minimize the potential damage from a rainstorm. A trough is cut in the back of the gargoyle and rainwater typically exits through the open mouth. Gargoyles are usually an elongated fantastical animal because the length of the gargoyle determines how far water is directed from the wall. When Gothic flying buttresses were used, aqueducts were sometimes cut into the buttress to divert water over the aisle walls." ~ Wikipedia

Monday, May 22, 2017

Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas


The Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas is a medieval church building in Galway, Ireland. It is a collegiate church and the parish church of St. Nicholas' Church of Ireland parish, which covers Galway city. It was founded in 1320 and dedicated to Saint Nicholas of Myra, the patron saint of seafarers, in recognition of Galway's status as a port. And, yeah, he's the same saint that later evolved into good ol' St. Nick and eventually into none other than Santa Claus. Weird, I know, but, well, sorta true. :-)