Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Organ


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

"The current organ in St Nicholas’ Collegiate Church was built in 1912 by the celebrated British firm of Norman & Beard, incorporating a small amount of pipework (subsequently much revoiced) from an earlier JW Walker instrument of 1845. It remains largely in its 1912 state, although subsequent repairs and overhauls took place in 1945, 1957-9, 1963, 1977-8 and 1982, during which most of the original tubular pneumatic actions were discarded in favour of electro-pneumatic replacements. These actions have become increasingly unreliable and unresponsive, and the pipework and windchests have suffered over the years from water inundation. In certain weather conditions the resultant ciphers and runnings can rend the organ unplayable." ~ http://stnicholas.ie/history/music-history/the-organ/

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

St. Nicholas


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

"Saint Nicholas of Myra (traditionally 15 March 270 – 6 December 342), also known as Nicholas of Bari, was an early Christian bishop of the ancient Greek city of Myra in Asia Minor (modern-day Demre, Turkey) during the time of the Roman Empire. He is revered by many Christians as a saint. Because of the many miracles attributed to his intercession, he is also known as Nicholas the Wonderworker. Saint Nicholas is the patron saint of sailors, merchants, archers, repentant thieves, children, brewers, pawnbrokers, and students in various cities and countries around Europe. His reputation evolved among the faithful, as was common for early Christian saints, and his legendary habit of secret gift-giving gave rise to the traditional model of Santa Claus ("Saint Nick") through Sinterklaas." ~ Wikipedia

Monday, May 29, 2017

Peter, James & John


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

The panel that appears below yesterday's images of Moses and Elijah. Here we have from left to right, probably, James, Peter, and John. 

Sunday, May 28, 2017

The Transfiguration


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

Once on the mountain, Matthew 17:2 states that Jesus "was transfigured before them, and his face shone like the sun, and his clothes became dazzling white." At that point the prophets Elijah and Moses appear and Jesus begins to talk to them.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

Shamrock


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

A shamrock is a young sprig and a symbol of Ireland. Saint Patrick, Ireland's patron saint, is said to have used it as a metaphor for the Holy Trinity. The name comes from Irish seamr√≥g, which is the diminutive of the Irish word for plant (seamair) and means simply 'little plant' or 'young plant.' 

Friday, May 26, 2017

Floral Arrangement


Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

My hat's off to whoever arranges these flowers. If these flowers don't lift your spirits, nothing will. :-)

Votives





Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

Votive or prayer candles are small candles intended to be burnt as votive offerings as acts of Christian prayer. In Christianity, votive candles are commonplace in many churches, as well as home altars, and symbolize the prayers the worshipper is offering for him or herself, or for others. In other religions, such as Hinduism and Buddhism, similar offerings exist.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Font


























Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

The baptismal font is over 400 years old and the dog carved into its side still keeps an eye on Galway’s newest citizens as they are baptized.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Gargoyle



Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
Galway, Ireland

"In architecture, a gargoyle is a carved or formed grotesque with a spout designed to convey water from a roof and away from the side of a building, thereby preventing rainwater from running down masonry walls and eroding the mortar between. Architects often used multiple gargoyles on a building to divide the flow of rainwater off the roof to minimize the potential damage from a rainstorm. A trough is cut in the back of the gargoyle and rainwater typically exits through the open mouth. Gargoyles are usually an elongated fantastical animal because the length of the gargoyle determines how far water is directed from the wall. When Gothic flying buttresses were used, aqueducts were sometimes cut into the buttress to divert water over the aisle walls." ~ Wikipedia

Monday, May 22, 2017

Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas


The Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas is a medieval church building in Galway, Ireland. It is a collegiate church and the parish church of St. Nicholas' Church of Ireland parish, which covers Galway city. It was founded in 1320 and dedicated to Saint Nicholas of Myra, the patron saint of seafarers, in recognition of Galway's status as a port. And, yeah, he's the same saint that later evolved into good ol' St. Nick and eventually into none other than Santa Claus. Weird, I know, but, well, sorta true. :-)

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Freeney's




























Freeney's
Galway, Ireland

No, I didn't actually have time to turn into Freeney's for either a shot of Galway Bay or a pint of Guinness. I just admired the collection of bottles and labels in one of their windows. And, actually, not even a drop of whiskey has ever passed between these lips. The same, however, cannot be said to be strictly true of Guinness. :-)

Whiskey in the Jar by The Dubliners  ūüéľ



Friday, May 19, 2017

Bodhr√°n


I stuck my head in this music shop off Quay Street because I spotted these drums through the shop's open door. What I later discovered is that the Bodhr√°n is not any drum; it's actually a traditional Irish drum and the heartbeat of Irish traditional music. Hear it as it's being played in this recording of--what else?--The Bodhr√°n.



Thursday, May 18, 2017

Quay Street


Quay Street
Galway, Ireland

Quay Street is obviously still the place to be in Galway even on a less than spectacular day. Why? Well, I suppose it's because of the street's "atmosphere"--the period architecture, the shops, the hostels and hotels, the pubs. The whole scene just screams, "Welcome to Ireland, mate!"

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Bóthar na Trá



So after catching my collecting flight from Newark to Shannon, I hopped a bus that took me north along the M18 to Galway and then to my hotel in Salthill or, as the locals call it, Bóthar na Trá. Can't pronounce it, but I understand a lot of folks from the Galway area can, thanks to an education system that has placed an emphasis upon teaching Ireland's native tongue. Thank goodness for the English translations on these signs! But, seriously, how would you pronounce "The Claddagh" or, for that matter, "Taibhdhearc Theatre?"